Introduction

The Tongariro Alpine Crossing track crosses stark and spectacular volcanic terrain.

Highlights

Among its highlights are steaming vents and hot springs, old lava flows, beautiful water filled explosion craters and stunning views. On clear days you can see Mount Taranaki in the west, Mount Ngauruhoe, the Kaimanawa Rangs, Lake Taupo and beyond. 

Track overview

19.4 km one way

Walking and tramping

5 hr 30 min - 7 hour 30 min Advanced: Tramping track

Dog access

No dogs

About this track

Highlights

Ngauruhoe viewed from the Mangatepopo valley
The Mangatepopo Valley

Mangatepopo Valley

It is generally believed that the Mangatepopo Valley was glacially carved out during the last ice age and subsequently partially in-filled by lava flows from Ngauruhoe.

Note the different colours on the lava flows as you walk up the valley. The surface colour of younger lava is darker and absorbs much of the sun's heat – this is a harsh environment for plants to grow and the reason why the youngest flows only have a few plants, lichens and moss.

The older flows have progressively more species and large plants, which take advantage of the slow build up of precious soil. The vegetation has also been modified by fire and farming.

Soda Springs

Near the head of the Mangatepopo Valley a short sidetrack leads to the cold water Soda Springs, which seep to the surface in a boggy area at the head of the Mangatepopo Stream. The springs are an oasis for the moisture-loving yellow buttercups (Ranunculus insignis).

The rocks at and below the springs are coloured golden by iron oxide, from the breakdown of volcanic ash in the bog. The water is slightly charged with dissolved gases and this effervescent quality inspired the name.

The water contains significant levels of dissolved minerals from the volcanic rock the water passes through on the way to the surface. It is not suitable for drinking.

Red Crater and Ngauruhoe.
Red Crater and Ngauruhoe

Red Crater

The rim of the spectacular active Red Crater forms the highest point of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. From the top you have extensive views across the Emerald and Blue lakes and beyond.

Its stunning red colour is from high temperature oxidation of iron in the rock. You can also see colours in the rock ranging from rich black, chocolate brown, rusty red and yellow.

You can see (and smell!) several active fumeroles (steam vents) in and around the crater. The gases coming out create bright yellow sulphur deposits. The top section of the crater rim is often free of snow in winter due to the thermal warmth of the ground there.

There is an interesting dike formation in the centre of the crater, a hollow lava tube formed when molten magma drained out from below and the outside solidified. You can see old lava flows from Red Crater extending into Oturere Valley, South crater and Central crater.

Emerald lake.
Emerald Lakes

Emerald Lakes 

As you descend from the northern edge of Red Crater, three water-filled explosion craters called the Emerald Lakes come into view. Their brilliant colour is because of minerals such as sulphur leaching from the adjoining thermal area.

The Maori name for the lakes is Ngarotopounamu meaning greenstone-hued lakes.

Despite being surrounded by fumaroles, the lakes are cold and freeze over in winter. The water is acidic with a pH of around 3-5.

Te Wai-whakaata-o-te-Rangihiroa.
Blue Lake

Blue Lake

Formed in an old volcanic lava vent, this is a freshwater lake up to 16 metres deep. Like the Emerald lakes the water is acidic with a pH of around 5.

Once again, dissolved minerals are responsible for its distinctive colour, and its waters are cold and acidic. Its Maori name is Te Wai-whakaata-o-te-Rangihiroa, which translates as Rangihiroa’s mirror. Te Rangihiroa was the son of local chief Pakaurangi, and is said to have explored the Tongariro volcanoes about AD 1750.

This lake is tapu (sacred). Do not swim in or eat food around the lake.

Te Maari craters

Te Maari steam vents.
Te Maari steam vents

The Te Maari craters on the northern side of Mount Tongariro burst into life on 6 August 2012 with a volcanic eruption. There was a second smaller eruption on 21 November 2012. Flying rocks from the August eruption caused damage to the track and the old Ketetahi hut.

This section of track passes through the Active Volcanic Hazard Zone - keep your stops to a minimum, and know the volcanic risks and what to do in the event of an eruption.

On the way down the track, you can see excellent views of the steaming vents, and evidence of the August eruption. There are impact craters from flying rocks, including a large one just below the Ketetahi shelter, and holes through the hut roof and floor. You can also see some of these rocks - any that look out of place and slightly yellow (from sulphur).

Prior to the 2012 eruptions, the Te Maari craters last erupted in 1896.

Ketetahi springs

Ketetahi springs steaming.
Ketetahi springs steaming

The Ketetahi springs is an area of thermal activity on the northern slopes of Mount Tongariro, at about 1400 m. The springs are located in a small area of private Maori land, and are not accessible from the Tongariro Alpine Crossing track. However, you can see wonderful views of the rising steam as you walk on the track.

There are a myriad of colours on the rocks around the springs area from the effects of the hot water and steam on the minerals in the andesitic rock. The largest fumerole in the springs area discharges superheated steam to about 138°C!

Lower down past the Ketetahi shelter, the track crosses a stream which originates at the Ketetahi springs. You can see here how the water and rock is coloured by the acidic and mineral-rich water.

Description

You can walk the track in either direction, although there is less climbing if you walk from Mangatepopo (1120 m) to Ketetahi (760 m). Shuttle buses operate for walking in this direction, with services to Mangatepopo in the morning and back from Ketetahi in the afternoon. Allow an extra hour to walk the track in reverse from Ketetahi to Mangatepopo.

Tongariro Alpine Crossing profile.
Tongariro Alpine Crossing profile

Walking time depends on your pace, the weather conditions, and how often you stop for breaks and sightseeing. Times given for each track section are approximate. Allow longer in winter conditions.

Ngauruhoe viewed from the Mangatepopo valley.
The Mangatepopo Valley

Mangatepopo Valley to Soda Springs

Time: 1 - 1 hr 30 min

Beginning at the Mangatepopo Road parking area (7 kilometres off of SH47), the track makes its way up the Mangatepopo Valley. The Mangatepopo hut and campsite is along a short side track 20 minutes from the parking area. Continuing at a gentle gradient the main track climbs alongside a stream and around the edges of old lava flows.

It is generally believed that the Mangatepopo Valley was glacially carved out during the last ice age and subsequently partially in-filled by lava flows from Ngauruhoe.

Water in Mangatepopo Stream is not suitable for drinking - it contains significant levels of dissolved minerals from the volcanic rock the water passes through on the way to the surface.

Note the different colours on the lava flows as you walk up the valley. The surface colour of younger lava is darker and absorbs much of the sun's heat - this is a harsh environment for plants to grow and the reason why the youngest flows only have a few plants, lichens and moss. The older flows have progressively more species and large plants, which take advantage of the slow build up of precious soil. The vegetation has also been modified by fire and farming.

Soda Springs.
Soda Springs

Side trip: Soda Springs

Time: 15 min return 

Near the head of the Mangatepopo Valley a short sidetrack leads to the cold water Soda Springs, which seep to the surface in a boggy area at the head of the stream. The springs are an oasis for the moisture loving yellow buttercups (Ranunculus insignis).

The rocks at and below the springs are coloured golden by iron oxide, from the breakdown of volcanic ash in the bog. The water is slightly charged with dissolved gases and this effervescent quality inspired the name.

Near the head of the valley a short side track leads to Soda Springs. The springs are an oasis for the moisture loving yellow buttercups and white foxgloves.

Soda Springs to South Crater

Time: 1 hr

The track climbs steadily, gaining 340 m from Soda Springs to South Crater. You cross over two lava flows from eruptions in 1870 and two pyroclastic flows from 1975. On a clear day there are magnificent views from this section of track, as far as Mount Taranaki on the west coast.

At the top of the climb the Tongariro Alpine Crossing continues east across South Crater. A sign indicates access to Ngauruhoe summit for keen and fit walkers!

Side trip: Mount Ngauruhoe summit (2287 m)

Ngauruhoe from South Crater.
Ngauruhoe from South Crater

Time: 3 hr  return from South Crater, 6 - 7 hr return from Mangatepopo parking area
Distance: 6 km return from South Crater, 19 km return from Mangatepopo parking area

Clear visibility and no strong wind is required to safely climb Mount Ngauruhoe. You also need good fitness - the volcano is steep, and the surface is mainly loose rock and stones (scree). The summit climb is not marked or formed.

South Crater to Red Crater

Time: 45 min - 1 hr

Follow the poled route across South Crater to a ridge leading up Red Crater. South Crater is not a real crater but a basin that may have been glacially carved, and has since filled with sediment from the surrounding ridges. An explosion pit in the southeast part of the crater formed around 14,000 years ago. The lava seen from Ngauruhoe dates back to the 1870 eruption.

As you walk up the ridge to Red Crater you can smell sulphur, evidence that Red Crater is still active. Enjoy the spectacular view to the east over the Kaimanawa Forest Park and Desert Road.

Looking into Red Crater notice the unusual formation within, known as a 'dike'. This feature was formed as molten magma moved to the surface through a vertical channel in the crater wall. Having solidified at its outer surface, the dike was later left partially hollow when the magma drained from below. Being more resistant than the surrounding scoria, erosion by wind and rain has now left this structure exposed.

The red colour is from high temperature oxidation of iron in the rock. You can see old lava flows from Red Crater extending into Oturere Valley, South and Central Craters.

From near the top of Red Crater you can take a side trip along a poled route to the summit of Mount Tongariro.

Tongariro summit route.
Tongariro summit route

Side trip: Mount Tongariro summit (1967 m)

Time: 1 - 2 hr return from near the top of Red Crater 

Clear visibility and no strong wind is required to safely climb Mount Tongariro. From Red Crater follow a poled route to the summit of Tongariro. The route is along an undulating rocky ridge, gaining less than 100 m in altitude.

Along the way you can see interesting volcanic rock formations, and fantastic views of the mountains and landscape - including Mount Ruapehu from the Tongariro summit itself.

Red Crater to Emerald Lakes

Lower Emerald Lake and Red Crater.
Lower Emerald Lake and Red Crater

Time: 10 - 20 min

The summit of Red Crater (1886 m) is the highest point on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. From here the track descends steeply to Emerald Lakes and you can see across to the Blue Lake past the Central Crater.

The Emerald Lakes' brilliant colour is caused by minerals leaching from the adjoining thermal area. You can see thermal steaming around the Red Crater and Emerald Lakes.

The Maori name for the lakes is Ngarotopounamu meaning greenstone-hued lakes. The water is cold and acidic, and they freeze in winter.

Take care on the steep descent on loose stony terrain (scree).

The next two sections of the track go through the active volcanic zone, near Te Maari craters - the site of the 2012 volcanic eruptions. Observe the warning signs, and keep your stops to a minimum. Know about the volcanic risks and what to do in an eruption.

Blue Lake (Te Wai-whakaata-o-te-Rangihiroa).
Blue Lake(Te Wai-whakaata-o-te-Rangihiroa)

Emerald Lakes to Ketetahi shelter

Time: 1 hr - 1 hr 30 min

The Tongariro Northern Circuit Great Walk to Oturere Hut branches off to the right at the lowest lake, while the Tongariro Alpine Crossing continues over Central Crater, a drainage basic rather than a true crater.

After a short climb out of Central Crater you can see Te Wai-whakaata-o-te-Rangihiroa / Blue Lake - this translates as Rangihiroa's mirror. Te Rangihiroa was the son of local chief Pakaurangi, and Te Maari (after whom the crater is named) was his sister. Te Rangihiroa is said to have explored the Tongariro volcanoes about AD 1750.

The Blue Lake is tapu (sacred) - do not swim in or eat food around the lake. From Blue Lake the track sidles around the flanks of North Crater (a cooled lava lake) and descends to Ketetahi shelter. 

An impact crater and Te Maari steam vents in the distance.
An impact crater and the Te Maari steam vents in the distance

You can see evidence from the volcanic eruptions in 2012 - excellent views of the new steaming vents at Te Maari craters, impact craters near the track, and damage to the Ketetahi hut.

To protect the fragile soil and plants it's important that you stay on the formed track.

The Ketetahi Springs are on private land. Walking the Tongariro Alpine Crossing doesn't give you the right to access the springs - keep to the track.

Ketetahi shelter to Ketetahi parking area

Time: 1 hr 30 min - 2 hr

The track continues to descend through golden tussock-covered slopes to the forest section. The tree line is the end of the Active Volcanic Hazard Zone. There are fantastic views of lakes Rotoaira and Taupo to the north. The cool podocarp-hardwood forest and its bird life provides a final contrast on the long descent to the roadend.

At two points the track passes over the tongue of a lava flow from Te Maari Crater and for a distance follows alongside the Manga-a-te-tipua Stream (polluted with minerals from the Ketetahi Springs). Toward the end of the track you can take a short side track to see a waterfall.

Know before you go

It is essential that you are properly prepared to walk the Crossing. It is not safe to go in poor visibility, heavy rain or snow, or strong wind. 

Your safety is your responsibility. To have a great time in the outdoors, know before you go the five simple rules of the Outdoor Safety Code to help you stay safe:

  1. Plan your trip
  2. Tell someone
  3. Be aware of the weather
  4. Know your limits
  5. Take sufficient supplies

1. Plan your trip

Seek local knowledge, plan your route and the amount of time you expect it to take.

It's important to plan, prepare and equip yourself well. Have the right gear and skills required for the trip and always check the latest information about facilities you plan to use, and local track and weather conditions.

On the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, be aware that:

  • The track surface is a mix of formed track/boardwalk, and rugged and exposed alpine terrain. There is only one section of forest at the northern end of the track.
  • You walk at a higher altitude. The track begins at 1120 m, the highest point (at the top of Red Crater) is 1886 m, and the track finishes at 760 m.
  • Most streams are bridged and there are no river crossings, but heavy rain can cause small streams to flood.
  • Major hazards are generally managed on the track during the summer (October to April). In winter the main hazard is snow/ice on the track.
  • Guided trips are available find commercial operators in Tongariro National Park, or contact the Tongariro National Park Visitor Centre or local i-SITE information centre

More information:

Check for alerts at the top of this page, or contact:

Tongariro National Park Visitor Centre
Phone:      +64 7 892 3729
Address:   Whakapapa Village
State Highway 48
Mount Ruapehu
Email:   tongarirovc@doc.govt.nz
Full office details
 

Watch a video on how to prepare for the Tongariro Alpine Crossing

View of Te Maari steaming vents from the track.
View of Te Maari steaming vents
from the track past the Blue Lake

Volcanic hazards

This is an active volcanic area, and eruptions are possible at any time without warning.

Active volcanic vents on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing are Mount Ngauruhoe, Red Crater, and Te Maari Craters. Volcanic hazard zones surround all of these vents. If you are within one of these areas when an eruption happens, you may be in danger.

Transport and parking

Transport options depend on the time of year. Bus services are weather dependent - they don't operate in bad weather conditions.

In the summer season there are many return shuttle bus services from local towns and accommodation providers. There are also one-way buses, if you wish to leave your car at either end of the track. Summer shuttle bus departure and pick-up times vary between the bus operators, but mostly depart 6 - 9 am and pick up 3  pm. View a list of approved providers.

In the winter season shuttle buses generally don't operate, but guided trips include transport.

There is a large parking area at Mangatepopo road trailhead, and a smaller parking area at Ketetahi road trailhead, if you wish to drive to either end of the track and do a shorter return hike.

Toilets

This is a sacred and fragile alpine area. Please use the toilet facilities provided.

Toilets are available at Mangatepopo and Ketetahi parking areas. There are also toilets at Soda Springs and Ketetahi shelter - with a 3 - 4 hour walk across open terrain in between.

2. Tell someone

Before you go into the outdoors, tell someone your plans and leave a date to raise the alarm if you haven't returned. To do this, use the New Zealand Outdoors Intentions process on the AdventureSmart website. It is endorsed by New Zealand's search and rescue agencies and provides three simple options to tell someone you trust the details about your trip.

Be aware of the weather

New Zealand's weather can be highly unpredictable - expect weather changes and be prepared for them.

On the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, be aware that: 

  • The weather in Tongariro National Park is often more extreme than other places in the North Island. Be prepared for cold, wet, snowy/icy, or windy weather at any time of year.

For your safety, it is essential that you are properly prepared to walk the Crossing. It is not safe to go in poor visibility, heavy rain or snow, or strong wind. The walk to Tama Lakes from Whakapapa Village is a good alternative day walk in suitable weather conditions.

More information:

Summer - December to March
  • The track is normally clear of snow and the weather is less severe.
  • Daylight hours are much longer and daytime temperatures can get into the teens or 20s (celcius).
  • The weather can be warm and sunny with light wind - but it can also be cold, wet and windy with poor visibility. The Crossing is on open and high altitude terrain with no shelter until near the end, so you are exposed to whatever weather conditions exist. The clothing you have with you is what will keep you warm.
Winter - June to September
  • Snow/ice can cover all or parts of the track.
  • Avalanches are possible during and after heavy snow falls. Check the avalanche advisory before you go. If risk applies, know how to assess the snowpack, carry a transceiver, shovel and probe and know how to use them. If the risk is high, don't go!
  • Walking and/or navigation can become more difficult.
  • Alpine experience and equipment is normally required during this period (crampons and ice axe, possibly avalanche transceiver, shovel and probe). Guided trips are available.

More information:

Hiking up Red Crater with crampons and ice axe.
Hiking up Red Crater with crampons
and ice axe in winter

Spring - October to November / Autumn - April - May
  • Snow can cover parts of the track.
  • The track can be slippery and icy when the ground freezes - even when there's no snow.
  • Weather can change dramatically between cold and wintery, to warm and summery.

4. Know your limits

Challenge yourself within your physical limits and experience.

On the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, be aware that:

  • The Crossing is classed as a tramping track. It is a demanding one day walk and you need reasonable fitness. You walk 19.4 km over a mixture of formed track and rough volcanic rock at alpine altitude. Some sections are steep, rocky or muddy. The track however is well marked with signs, poles or markers.
  • Most stream crossings are bridged, however heavy rain can make unbridged streams difficult to cross safely.

You can expect:

  • To walk for 6 - 8 hours, possibly longer depending on your fitness and trip plan.
  • To carry a day pack for 19.4 km.
  • To walk up a total of 766 m and walk down a total of 1126 m. There are two challenging uphill climbs of 45 minutes to 1 hour each, and a steep descent of 20 minutes on a loose rock (scree) surface. There are sections of stairs going uphill and downhill.
  • Much of the track has a hard, rocky and uneven surface.

have enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency rations for the worst-case scenario.
Take enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency food for the worst-case scenario

5. Take sufficient supplies

You must be self sufficient: be sure you have enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency food for the worst-case scenario.

Take an appropriate means of communication such as a cellphone and/or personal locator beacon. Personal locator beacons can be rented from various outlets, check details on the Rescue Co-ordination Centre NZ website

On the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, be aware that:

  • Water is not available on the track. Bring at least 1-2 litres per person. 
  • Water from the Mangatepopo Stream, Emerald Lakes, Blue Lake and Mangatipua Stream (from Ketetahi Springs) is not suitable for drinking due to high volcanic mineral content, acidity and/or the risk of giardia.
  • Food is not available for purchase at the track. Bring high energy food and extra rations in case your trip takes longer than expected.
  • Cell phone coverage is reasonably good along the track, but there are sections that there is no coverage.

More information:

What to take

Part of having a great time in the outdoors is to be properly prepared. The following clothing and equipment is essential for all walkers on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. Be prepared for wet, cold, windy weather.

Clothing and equipment

Well dressed hikers at Red Crater.
Well dressed hikers at Red Crater

You need plenty of warm and waterproof clothing to hike the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. Cotton clothing such as jeans, T-shirts and sweatshirts doesn't keep you warm - it is not suitable.

  • Waterproof and windproof jacket is essential in case of wet/windy weather. Waterproof overtrousers are good to have also.      
  • Warm wool, polypropylene, and/or fleece base layers (tops and leggings).
  • Sturdy hiking boots or shoes with good soles. Boots are better as they give ankle support and are normally waterproof.
  • Food is not available for purchase on the track. Bring food that is lightweight and high energy, such as cereal bars, dried fruit/nuts, crackers/sandwiches, fresh fruit.
  • Water is not available on the track (stream and lake water is not OK to drink). Bring a water bottle or hydration pack of 1 - 3 litres.
  • First aid kit (sunscreen, blister kits, pain relief, band-aids/bandages, personal medications)
  • Sunglasses and sunhat
  • Warm hat and warm gloves
  • Map and compass or GPS. The track is well marked but you should have at least a basic map with you.

Clothing and equipment rental

Transport operators often have waterproof clothing and walking boots available to rent for the day.

You can rent jackets, overtrousers and hiking boots, plus some other equipment in towns surrounding the Tongariro National Park. See rental outlets in National Park Village - National Park Village website.

During winter and snow conditions

  • Ice axe and crampons - and know how to use them
  • Avalanche equipment (probe, transceiver, shovel) - and know how to use them
  • Snow gaiters
  • Snow goggles

Winter tramping

Before you go, check:

Be well prepared with proper winter tramping clothing and equipment.

On this page:

What to expect

Hiking up icy Red Crater.
Hiking up icy Red Crater with crampons

The Tongariro Alpine Crossing in winter is not for the faint-hearted, however if you are properly equipped and prepared or go with a guided group, it is a fantastic experience.

Alpine skills and experience are required for dealing with snow and ice, avalanche risk, and subzero temperatures. If you don't have this, guided trips are available. See a list of commercial operators in Tongariro National Park

Although the Emerald and Blue Lakes are not visible as they are frozen and covered by snow, the thermal steaming and spectacular volcanic features of Tongariro and Ngauruhoe surround you.

There are no shuttle buses in the winter. Experienced independent walkers can drive to either end of the track, walk part way (i.e. to the snowline) and return to their vehicle. Guided trips include return transport.

Water is not available on the track - bring 1-2 liters per person. Water from upper Mangatepopo Stream, Emerald Lakes, Blue Lake and Ketetahi Springs is not suitable for drinking due to high volcanic mineral content, acidity and/or the risk of giardia).

What to wear and take with you

Frozen Blue and Emerald Lakes.
Frozen Blue and Emerald Lakes

  • Crampons and ice axe
  • Snow gaiters 
  • Avalanche probe, snow shovel and transceiver
  • Sturdy hiking boots
  • Waterproof jacket and overtrousers
  • Warm wool or polypropylene under-clothing
  • Warm hat and gloves 
  • First aid kit
  • Sunscreen, sun hat and sunglasses
  • A map and compass or GPS
  • High energy food and water 

Avalanche danger scale.
The Backcountry Avalanche Advisory is available on the NZ Avalanche Centre website

Avalanches

Parts of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing track are on avalanche terrain and you should be prepared for avalanche risk, and know when it's not safe to go.

Avalanches are the most common during the winter and spring, from July through to October, but can happen for several months either side of that period if there are heavy snowfalls.

Snow can fall at any time of the year in the higher parts of the park - therefore avalanches are also possible, but not common, at other times of the year on the glaciers and the steeper higher-altitude terrain in the park. 

Avalanche Terrain Exposure Scale (ATES)
Description  ClassTerrain criteria
Simple 1 Exposure to low-angle or primarily forested terrain. Some forest or bush openings may involve the run-out zones of infrequent avalanches. Many options to reduce or eliminate exposure.
No glacier travel.
Challenging 2 Exposure to well defined avalanche paths, starting zones or terrain traps; options exist to reduce or eliminate exposure with
careful route finding. Glacier travel is straight forward, but crevasse hazards may exist.
Complex 3 Exposure to multiple, overlapping avalanche paths or large expanses of steep, open terrain; multiple avalanche starting zones and terrain traps below; minimal options to reduce exposure.
Complicated glacier travel with extensive crevasse bands or icefalls.

Tongariro and Ngauruhoe in winter.
Tongariro and Ngauruhoe in winter

How does ATES apply on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing?

Most of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing is simple terrain, however the section of track that crosses over Red Crater between South Crater and Emerald Lakes contains challenging and complex terrain. The section of track from Blue Lake to Ketetahi contains challenging terrain.

During periods when there is snow present people should not venture past either the Ketetahi or Mangatepopo car parks without the right avalanche expertise and equipment, or should be accompanied by an experienced guide.

A large proportion of the Tongariro National Park below 1700 m is classed as simple avalanche terrain; elevations above this altitude are mainly challenging or complex avalanche terrain.

All visitors to the national park should consider carefully the class of avalanche terrain they will be travelling through. Due to the nature of the weather conditions in the park the avalanche hazard can change with very little warning.

Further information:

 

 

Download the Tongariro Alpine Crossing app

Download the app for free.
Download the Pocket Ranger to enjoy an interpreted trip of the Alpine Crossing

Check out the free interpretive app for the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. It's just like taking a ranger with you in your pocket!

Anyone who has done the Tongariro Alpine Crossing can relate to marvelling at the sheer beauty and scale of the landscape and wondering why the Red Crater is red, the Emerald Lakes are just so, and whether or not the hot ground under your feet is likely to erupt from under you. So we have developed an app you can download for free and take with you, to help tell the unique stories of the awesome landscape of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing.

Called the Pocket Ranger, the app provides stories, photos and video, maps, and safety messages for the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, as well as providing information about the local area including accommodation, activities, transport, guiding and dining.

Developed by DOC and Project Tongariro you can download it here: www.tongariro.org.nz/pocketranger.

Contacts

Tongariro National Park Visitor Centre
Phone:      +64 7 892 3729
Address:   Whakapapa Village
State Highway 48
Mount Ruapehu
Email:   tongarirovc@doc.govt.nz
Full office details
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